Wednesday, August 15, 2018

Chicago day trip to see John Singer Sargent

Gushing over the paintings of old masters is what I and many of my artist friends love to do.  Portrait artists are well-acquainted with the work of this American painter, John Singer Sargent (1856-1925).  While there have been many amazing portrait artists through the generations, he was a top artist of his generation.  He was a maestro with the brush, and he painted many famous and wealthy patrons, as well as fellow artists and working-class paid models. 


This one of James Whitcomb Riley is at The Indianapolis Art Museum (Newfields):


Here are a few of my Sargent favorites (not necessarily in the Chicago show):








A group of us loaded into a van (thanks for driving, Kim Thomson!) on 8/9/18 and headed to the Art Institute of Chicago to see this exhibition of his work (see this short video created by the museum):


                                                                                    


This show was wonderful!  There is nothing like standing in front of these paintings.  Such a precious piece of history!  Many of them are life-size, and his subjects are fascinating.   I could go on and on about his style of painting but I will do my best to be brief.  But just look at this close up of a boy's foot...
He can paint a shoe with just a couple of perfectly placed dashes of color. 

I was most excited because I could see a Zorn palette of colors over an initial red undertone, just as I recently did in my own mother's portrait!  I never imagined that he had ever started his painting on a red ground, but there it was, peaking all around that shoe!!  I really nerded out over this.
Me at the opening reception for the Hoosier Salon 2018 Annual Exhibition
My friend Stephanie and I had our sketchbooks ready and did some sketching at the show. 
Copying a master work, even certain portions of it, is an excellent lesson. You may think you have studied an artwork closely, but if you take the time to copy it, you can uncover a whole new layer of information. In my sketch, I was imitating his use of line. I felt a connection to what his thoughts and decisions might have been at the moment he drew this hand. I could almost imagine it in video. I need to do this WAY more often!

Another venue we packed into our day was the Palette & Chisel Academy of Fine Arts.   

This organization has a rich history going back 115 years.  Here is one borrowed photo from their website:
Look at all these MEN artists!  Such were the times then.
 Here is that same room now (music added later):

This is the 3rd floor of P&C.  Artists gather here to paint from live models or to take classes and workshops.  We are already discussing a day to return to this historic studio to pay our $20 and paint from a live model for 3 hours.  Sure, we can do this in Indy as well, but how cool to do it at the Palette & Chisel!  If I lived in Chicago, this would be my hang out for sure!

Thank you to Daralyn for showing us around, and for allowing us to tour your own studio there on the 2nd floor!  It was a pleasure to meet you!



No comments: